Big River Track – Waiuta to Big River Mine

The Big River Track from Waiuta - Victoria Forest Park - Tinytramper

The Big River Track – Waiuta to Big River Mine

This weekend’s hike took us South West into Victoria Forest Park. If like me, you haven’t heard of it before, it is roughly sandwiched between the Nelson Lakes National Park to the East, and the Paparoa range to the West. The nearest town is Reefton. There are lots of walking tracks in the park, and we walked the ‘Big River Track‘ from Waiuta to Big River.

We chose this track because it is pretty low elevation (we didn’t fancy hiking up any mountains on an average-weather Winters day…) it takes you from (and to) some really interesting historical areas, it is a good overnighter, and the track is pretty easy. The track is 11Kms from Waiuta to Big River hut, and depending how much exploring you want to do, DoC recommends between 3-5 hours to walk the track. We took just under 4 hours on the outbound walk and just under 3 hours return.

The beautiful Big River Track - Victoria Forest Park
The beautiful Big River Track – Victoria Forest Park

Getting there

We left Nelson at 7.50am, and headed South down the SH6 towards Murchison for an obligatory coffee stop. From Murchison we continued on the SH6 towards Greymouth and turned off at Inangahua – a place name I will never forget because it took me an hour to learn it! From Inangahua we took the 69 to sleepy little Reefton then took the SH7 as far as Hukarere and turned off on the Waiuta Road. We reached Waiuta at 10.50am.

Heading South on the SH6 from Nelson to Inangahua
Heading South on the SH6 from Nelson to Inangahua

Getting going

My day began with something of a fright.. I had moved house-sits the week before and hadn’t yet unpacked my tramping gear, so I pulled everything out of the box, and got dressed. I threw my hair up into a bun, and was eating my breakfast when I felt a little tickle up the back of my neck in my hairline. A sixth sense told me to scoop rather than slap whatever it was, and to my horror a large cockroach plopped to the floor.

I hate cockroaches. They were regular visitors in my last house-sit, and this one had obviously hitched a lift in my tramping gear. You can only imagine the utter panic and chaos that ensued to find the bug spray, then check all my clothes for cockroaches. It wasn’t a great start to the day.

We left Nelson at 7.50am and headed to Murchison, swinging into the Hope Saddle lookout to use the loo (clean, in excellent order, no wasps in winter) and for a look at the snow-capped mountains to the South. There was one brave camper-vanner parked at the lookout, but we saw no sign of the occupants. The temperature guage in the car read 4 degrees, so no doubt they were keeping warm until the sun hit the van.

Murchison

At 9.20am we got to Murchison and stopped off at the Rivers Cafe for a coffee and a delicious muffin. We’d been hanging out for some amazing French pastries from the Sweet Dreams French Bakery opposite, but unfortunately they didn’t have any baking out yet – and we later learned that it changed owners in March and may no longer be French. We had a ferret around the awesome second hand store next to the Rivers Cafe before jumping back in the car and heading on.

We were back on the road by 9.50am and reached Reefton at 10.50am. It is only a 20 minute drive to Waiuta from Reefton via the tiny little settlement of Blackwater. We passed the beautiful Blackwater School and made a note that we’d stop there on our way back.

Waiuta

Whether or not you’re a history buff, Waiuta and the surrounding area is a fascinating place to visit. Between 1906 and 1951 it was the town servicing the largest gold mine in New Zealand’s South island, and in the 1930s had a population of over 600 people. It is now a historic town site managed by DoC. There could be a whole blog post dedicated to it, but instead I will leave you in the capable hands of the official Waiuta website and New Zealand History website.

We stopped at the first of many information boards and had a bit of a drive around the town. We hadn’t realised that there was so much to see here! However the day was getting away with us, so we decided to find the track and come back tomorrow to take a proper look around.

The entrance to Waitua - a mining 'ghost town'
The entrance to Waitua – a mining ‘ghost town’
An overview of Waiuta - former gold mining town
An overview of Waiuta – former gold mining town

The Big River Track

We drove a short distance out of Waiuta in the direction of the Prohibition mine and parked at the small car park at the start of the Big River Track. We started walking at midday. The track initially starts off on a four-wheel drive track for a Km or so, before turning left into the forest. It then follows an old, benched pack track sidling along the upper Western flank of the Snowy River valley at an elevation of around 700m.

The track was easy and beautiful, with a couple of very gentle ups and downs. We started walking an a light drizzle, surprised at how cold it was!

Starting the Big River Track - Victoria Forest Park
Starting the Big River Track – Victoria Forest Park
A drizzly start to the Big River Track
A drizzly start to the Big River Track

There was plenty to keep the track interesting, with the beautiful forest around us, fallen trees, and some interesting mushrooms at our feet. This part of the world clearly doesn’t get a lot of sun, but does get a lot of rain, and as we continued I think we saw every possible kind of moss that New Zealand has!

We saw a few robins along the track, but heard few other birds apart from one pocket where there were lots of tiny birds chirping away in the canopy. They were too high up for us to see what they were, and unfortunately we didn’t recognise their song.

Tiny mushrooms on the Big RiverTrack
Tiny mushrooms on the Big RiverTrack
Mossy fallen trees on the Big River Track
Mossy fallen trees on the Big River Track
Moss, moss and more moss...
Moss, moss and more moss…

After a couple of hours we began to get really cold. We stopped for a lunch break and to put another layer of clothing, gloves and hats on. At around 7Kms the track came up and out of the Snowy River valley and into a branch of the Sunderland Creek. Thankfully as soon as we crossed we could feel the warmth slowly creep back into us.

Mine Sites

The track narrowed as we came down into the creek and we walked through the beautiful creek bed itself.  We managed to rock hop to avoid wet feet, but if it was raining no doubt the trickle of a stream we walked through would be considerably higher.

Where the path is the stream
Where the path is the stream
Old mining relics along the Big River Track
Old mining relics along the Big River Track

We soon came to the site of the abandoned St George mine. There was evidence of some kind of shaft from the track – a gap in the beautful mossy surroundings. A little further on we dropped our packs and took a look at a site which was signposted from the track. We wandered down a short and very boggy track but there wasn’t anything to see. On the basis of that we skipped the Big River South mine about 10 minutes further up the track.

Near the St George Mine site Big River Track
Near the St George Mine site Big River Track

Boardwalk across the pakihi

After the Big River South mine we climbed a little and eventually came out onto an area of wet heathland. I was reliably informed this was known as ‘pakihi’ wetlands, a completely new word for me. A quick Google search later told me that pakihi are a wetland characterised by infertile soils and little or no peat. The large amount of rainwater that falls here has nowhere to go due to the impervious layer of rock underneath the soil. The soil becomes infertile and can only support a special kind of vegetation.

 

Love a nice boardwalk - heading towards Big River hut
Love a nice boardwalk – heading towards Big River hut
Big River hut
Big River hut

Shortly afterwards, at 3.45pm we reached the 20 bed (…but actually looked like it would easily sleep 26) Big River hut. Thankfully, there was a coal fire going in the stove, left by the group who lunched here. The hut was lovely and warm. We got to work sweeping the floor, rebuilding the fire and making a hot cup of soup. I say ‘we’ but actually on reflection, I mostly looked at the beautiful view and got changed into some warm clothes.

The view over Big River and the cyanide ponds from Big River hut
The view over Big River and the cyanide ponds from Big River hut

Adventures from Big River hut

We enjoyed our cup of hot soup and were delighted to warm up several notches. Time was getting on and we only had a couple of hours daylight left, so we summoned up some energy, changed out of our snuggly hut clothes and went back out to have a scout around the mining sites close to the hut.

We learned that below the hut was the old cyanide plant and mine battery (which has undergone a lot of remedial work to make it safe for the public to wander around). Rock that was mined from the Big River mine was crushed here in the battery before the gold was separated out using chemicals.

Looking up at Big River hut from Big River
Looking up at Big River hut from Big River

We really wanted to see the other parts of the mine site, but this required a crossing of Big River. It was actually a small river, but enough of a river to get our shoes and boots soaked. We didn’t want wet(ter) shoes/boots at this late stage in the day, so there was only one thing for it. We took our shoes and socks off to cross.

It was FREEZING!! Being English, I love to complain, but the profanity I uttered as my feet went numb in the 50 seconds it took to cross the river, really was next-level.

Big River Mine Engine Room and Poppet Head

Suffering the very very cold river was worth it for the cool historical stuff up the hill. We followed the four wheel drive track about a Km and came to the restored engine house and winding room. Inside, we marvelled at the workings. This used to be the control centre for the mine and the ‘winding engines’ hauled rock out of the mine above, and took men and equipment down into the mine.

The Big River mine was open from 1829 to 1942 and was at one point, the deepest mine shaft in New Zealand at 602m. A huge 4.3m diameter water wheel used to power the winders before they converted to steam engine in 1895.

Inside the engine room at Big River mine
Inside the engine room at Big River mine
Inside the engine room at Big River mine
Inside the engine room at Big River mine
Looking up to the poppet head from the engine room at Big River mine
Looking up to the poppet head from the engine room at Big River mine

Poppet Head

We wanted to visit the poppet head mostly because it has the word ‘poppet’ in it. Secondly because it continued the awesome historical discoveries we were making, and finally because we knew there would be an amazing view. There was a sign indicating it was a 25 minute walk up and along the four-wheel drive track. Twenty minutes later we arrived and it didn’t disappoint.

A poppet head is the building/frame that sits over the top of a mineshaft. It houses the winding mechanism of pulleys and ropes that come up from the winding house, and go down into the mine. We walked around and looked down at the engine house over the ‘mullock’ pile. Today’s second new word – meaning the worthless rock that was taken out of the mine and tipped over the egde.

Info about the Poppet Head at Big River mine
Info about the Poppet Head at Big River mine
Big River mine poppet head
Big River mine poppet head
Looking down to the engine house
Looking down to the engine house

We spent some time admiring the view and basking in the evening sunset, before heading back down. We opted to go down ‘the quick way’. To the left of the engine room (as we looked down upon it) we could see a steep, sketchy little path that went down the line of vegetation that would bring us out at the engine room. We were down in 5 minutes.

We headed back towards the hut via ‘tin town’ which was the site where the miners used to live. There were a few remenants, but sadly the impression we were left with was of an area ruined by four-wheel drive vehicles.

Back at Big River hut

We got back to the hut at 6.30pm and enjoyed a gourmet dinner of pre-prepared risotto and a Greek salad. Someone had kindly left a box of shiraz wine, which we enjoyed with dinner. At 8.30pm just as we were thinking of heading to bed, we saw the lights of 2 four-wheel drive vehicles slowly heading towards the hut (Big River hut is accessible by vehicle from Reefton).

Some trampers will know that sinking feeling you get when you think you are lucky enough to get the hut to yourselves, only to have a bunch of people turn up late… As there were two vehicles, we expected 6-8 people. It turned out to be 2 friendly guys from Christchurch, who we enjoyed a lovely evening with.

Big River hut to Waiuta and Prohibition Mine

In the morning we enjoyed a very leisurely breakfast as the sun warmed the hut. We lazed around on the balcony chatting and eventually left 10am. We arrived back at Waiuta at 12.50pm.

A beautiful day for our return to Waiuta
A beautiful day for our return to Waiuta

When we got back to the car, we headed up the road to take a look at the Prohibition mine site. This site was recently cleaned of the huge amounts of arsenic that used to be present, and is now (mostly) accessible to the public.

Relics at Prohibition Mine
Relics at Prohibition Mine

Back to Waiuta

When we got back to Waiuta we had a nice surprise as we discovered that amongst the 40 or so people attending a Geology conference there, was my partner’s dad. It never fails to amaze me that New Zealand is such a small place, and that you can go to some of the most remote parts of it and bump into someone you know (like I did on my Whanganui River section of Te Araroa Trail).

We had a quick chat before the geologists headed off to look at formations, and we had a delicious lunch. Afterwards we wandered around Waitua, checking out the post office, the swimming pool (!) and the Blackwater mine site.

Blackwater mine site - Waiuta
Blackwater mine site – Waiuta
Relics at Waiuta
Relics at Waiuta

Blackwater

On the drive home we honoured our promise to stop in at the beautiful Blackwater village school. If you ever find yourself in this part of the world don’t miss it! Not only is it one of the prettiest old buidings I’ve seen in New Zealand, but inside it is a treasure trove of local history. It was wonderful.

Blackwater village school
Blackwater village school

It was one of those weekends that wasn’t quite long enough. I’d have loved to have stayed to do some more exploring, and to spend some time in sleepy little Reefton, but a 3.5 hour drive home was on the cards. There are definitely more trips to be done here and I’m really glad it’s now on the radar.

To break up our journey home, we hopped out to do a little recce of the rapids on the Buller river.

Checking out the rapids on the Buller River
Checking out the rapids on the Buller River

 

 

 

 

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